MEMORY AND BRAIN AMYLOID AND TAU EFFECTS OF CURCUMIN IN NON-DEMENTED ADULTS: A DOUBLE-BLIND, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED 18-MONTH TRIAL

April 23, 2019 Science Blog By

Background

Because the anti-inflammatory and anti-amyloid properties of curcumin could protect the brain from age-related neurodegeneration and memory decline, we studied the effects of curcumin on memory performance in non-demented adults and explored its potential impact on brain amyloid plaques and tau tangles using FDDNP-PET.

Methods

Forty subjects (age 51 to 84 years) were randomized to a bioavailable form of curcumin 90 mg twice daily [N=21] or placebo [N=19]) for 18 months. Primary outcome measures were verbal and visual memory. Change in attention (Trail Making Test, part A) was a secondary outcome. FDDNP-PET signals (15 curcumin, 15 placebo) were determined at baseline and 18 months in amygdala, hypothalamus, medial and lateral temporal, posterior cingulate, parietal, and frontal regions. Analyses included mixed effects general linear models with age and education as covariates, and effect size (ES; Cohen’s d) estimates.

Conclusions

These results suggest that daily oral curcumin supplementation leads to improved memory and attention in non-demented middle-aged and older adults. The FDDNP-PET findings raise the hypothesis that decreases in plaque and tangle accumulation in brain regions modulating mood and memory are associated with curcumin supplementation.

References

  1. July 2017Volume 13, Issue 7, Supplement, Page P1264 \ Gary W. Small1,Email the author Gary W. Small
  2. Prabha Siddarth, Linda Ercoli, Koon-Pong Wong, Jacqueline Martinez, Natacha D. Emerson, David A. Merrill, Nagichettiar Satyamurthy, Sung-Cheng Huang, Zhaoping Li, David Heber, Jorge R. Barrio
  3. P4-025

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